Meme: Passion Quilt

I’ve been tagged by Sylvia for the Passion Quilt Meme.  I’ve decided to pull from my personal collection for this photo meme.  The photo above is of our daughter after helping me to find a geocache almost 3 years ago.

Often times when we go geocaching we don’t find a cache because we see something more interesting.  Be it animal tracks, a scurrying animal or a odd looking tree formation, a learning opportunity presents itself.  When she inquires about the discovery, why would I squander that with an agenda to find a box of trinkets? 

Far too often I hear students say that they there is nothing to do, that they are bored.  They’ll sit and do nothing, but stare at the flashing of a computer screen, television or their video games. Hogwash.  (Note: While I advocate for each of these in educational and entertainment value, however, we must remember moderation is key.) 

So my passion is about active learning, learning by doing.  Learning by doing things, not just spewing what they know.  When we are out and about, we open opportunities for play and discovery resulting in learning.

Directions: Find or create an image that captures what you are most passionate for kids to learn about.

  • Post a picture from a source like Flickr Creative Commons or make/take your own that captures what YOU are most passionate about for kids to learn…and give your picture a short title.
  • Title your blog post “Meme: Passion Quilt” and link back to this blog entry.
  • Include links to 5 folks in your professional learning network or whom you follow on Twitter/Pownce.

I’m tagging these folks from my regional network:

Blogged with Flock

Tags: , , ,

Hey Kids! Google Wants You!

I know this has been all over the net by the time I post this, but for those folks that haven’t seen it check this out… Google wants students to Doodle for them. Pass this on to anyone who has that little knack for Doodling (Hint: teachers check those notebooks and textbooks… they just might be filled with Doodle gold!)

[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/TOOY0xuQ3TU" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

Tags: , , ,

Local Over Global Network Building

I’ve been thinking more and more about the networks/communities we build using technology. My experience at Educon had me thinking even more about it as several of the attendees discussed building global networks vs. local networks. Reading about the Science Leadership Academy’s culture you’ll see that local communities of learners (educators included) without the focus on making global connections can be extremely powerful for learning.

As I read more I’m finding that there is power in the using all these tools available to us on the web for connecting with those in our areas. A recent article in Wired Magazine states (substitute educational words where appropriate):

One day, perhaps, virtual communication will become so good we’ll no longer feel the need to shake hands with a new collaborator or brainstorm in the same room. But for now, the world seems to be changing in a way that actually demands more meetings. Business is more innovative, and its processes more complex. That demands tacit knowledge, collaboration, and trust — all things that seem to follow best from person-to-person meetings. “Ideas are more important than ever,” Glaeser says, “and the most important ideas are communicated face-to-face.”

I’ve always hailed the power of having global connections and I will continue to do so, but I now believe a lot more time and energy should be put towards building our local connections and sharing the power of these tools to collaborate locally or regionally. Connecting with folks from places around the country or world is powerful for sure, but what of the immediate connections here at home? It’s one thing to show a nay-sayer administrator or colleague how a classroom is connecting with another in a remote location, but another to show how several local classrooms are collaborating to take on an authentic environmental or cultural issue in their local area. Wouldn’t we all benefit from building stronger connections that add value to what we are doing locally?

In terms of professional networks, I like the concept of the regional PLP. This is an opportunity for us to connect with each other, share thoughts and ideas, build blogs to share information/projects to join, ask questions and lend support for each other. It’s our chance to really set an example for the rest of our region and local districts to take a look at what is possible in the new learning environments that we are exploring here.

Photo Credit: Nebraska Library Commission

Tags: , , , , , ,